Playing in the dirt.

Posts tagged ‘herbs’

Making Haste Slowly

Very little in the way of new news to share, though there is one sprout in my salad planters as of Saturday’s quick trip to the office to check on seedlings, and there’s evidence that an eggplant is going to sprout.  Friday, I planted some more tomatoes and eggplants, in case something catastrophic happens to the first batch, and I planted kale.  This coming Friday, I’ll get the shallots started (from seed, so apparently not “true” shallots, which Teh Internetz suggests only propagate by bulb division).  The sprouts that came up this week are doing well.

Assorted sprouts in starter peats.

Assorted sprouts.

The Anaheims and onions are still visible in the far container, along with the lemon mint, with the Genovese basil and the so far lone Pasilla in the back corners.  But another Pasilla was suggesting it might sprout soon when I checked on things Saturday.  In the near container, from left to right are: Mexico Midget, Italian Heirloom, Opalka, and Beam’s Yellow Pear, along with the lime basil.

And because we’re gardening at 7200 feet, it was cold and snowy and windy all weekend, so I’ve not yet managed to get anything accomplished outside.

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Tomato and Herbs

Just a quick post today, to show off the most recent arrivals.  Today brought a Mexico midget tomato sprout, and yesterday brought the herb sprouts (rows from top to bottom: Genovese basil, lemon mint, lime basil).  The herbs doubled in size over the course of my workday today.  Two herb peats have no-shows, and I’ll replant those Friday if they haven’t arrived by then.

Genovese basil, lemon mint, and lime basil sprouts in starter peats.

Herbs, herbs, herbs.

Mexico midget is an indeterminate cherry variety.  “Indeterminate” means that it’s a vine type that grows continuously and produces fruit over the course of a season, as opposed to the “determinate” bush varieties that grow to a pre-determined size and set their fruit all at once.  Indeterminates are good for fresh eating all summer and need trellised to support their long vines, while determinates are good for canning and freezing, because the whole crop is usually ready at one time, making for more efficient processing.

A Mexico midget tomato sprout in a starter peat.

Mexico midget tomato sprout.