Playing in the dirt.

Hello, world!

I’m starting the second year of my garden.  (I’ll get some more photos of last year’s harvests posted eventually.)  The plans for this year include adding more space in a 4×16 foot bed and some assorted “hills” for some plants that will need more room to spread out.  This year, I’m ordering all heirloom varieties, so I can try to save seed from the plants that do the best in my climate.  Some plants are biennials, so I’ll need to over-winter some and see if they survive to produce seed in their second year.  I ordered my first round of seeds on March 2, so I could get some plants started indoors, and I ordered the rest of my seeds on March 14, after making some final decisions. This year, I’m trying the Jiffy “greenhouses” with the peat pellets, and if they do well, I’ll make my own starter pots next year with more sustainable coir.

From Seed Savers Exchange, I ordered:

  • Blacktail Mountain Watermelon (developed in northern Idaho, where the overnight temperatures are similar to our cool nights)
  • Cheyenne Bush Pumpkin (developed in SE Wyoming)
  • Italian Heirloom Tomato (a red slicing tomato)
  • Opalka Tomato (a red paste tomato)
  • Mexico Midget Tomato (red cherry tomato)
  • Beam’s Yellow Pear Tomato (cherry-sized)
  • Zebrune Shallot
  • Blue Jade Corn (a dwarf sweet corn – I ordered two packets, since this only comes with 25 seeds per packet)
  • Dragon Carrot (bright red skin, I couldn’t resist)
  • Paris Market Carrot (a really thick carrot that I’m thinking will be an excellent roaster)
  • Bountiful Snap Bean (long straight green beans)
  • Sultan’s Golden Crescent Bean (a rare yellow curved bean)
  • Titan Sunflowers (these have a short growing season but grow to enormous size, up to two feet across in ideal climate)
  • Lemon Mint (to feed the bees)
  • Triple Curled Parsley
  • Prize Choy (a dwarf bok choy)
  • Bunte Forellenschluss (a butterhead version of the Forellenschluss I selected last year by virtue of it having freckles)

From Baker Creek Heirloom Seeds, I ordered:

  • Dwarf Siberian Kale
  • Yellow of Parma Onion
  • Charentais Melon (a true cantaloupe)
  • Anaheim Chile Pepper
  • Pasilla Bajio Chile Pepper
  • Miyashage Daikon (a Japanese radish that Mr. Teaspoon requested)
  • Henderson’s Bush Lima Bean
  • Bloomsdale Long Standing Spinach
  • Black Beauty Zucchini
  • Lolla Rossa Lettuce (red leaf)
  • Genovese Basil (traditional Italian basil)
  • Lime Basil (basil with a citrus note)
  • Common Chives
  • Bouquet Dill
  • Dwarf Jewel Mix Nasturtiums (smaller than the aggressively vining varieties, these edible flowers will also feed bees)
  • Half Long Guernsey Parnsip (my true long shot for the season, as parsnips usually require a long season)
  • Early Scarlet Globe Radish
  • French Breakfast Radish
  • Arugula (or “rocket” for my British pals, a mildly bitter green that is excellent in salads when young and can be used like spinach in cooking when older)
  • Mizuna (a Japanese green similar to mustard greens)
  • Cilantro
  • Lovage (somewhat like celery, if it just grew leaves instead of long stalks, used similarly)
  • Early White Vienna Kohlrabi (a cabbage relative grown for its bulbous stem)
  • Rossa di Treviso Radicchio (also by Mr. Teaspoon’s specific request)
  • Purple Top White Globe Turnips (they did so well last year)
  • Iceberg Lettuce (for crunch in the salads)

I planted my onion seeds indoors on March 12, and today, I had sprouts!

Onion sprouts in peat pellet starter medium.

These eager onions sprouted in only three and a half days.

Advertisements

Comments on: "Teaspoon’s Garden 2: Electric Boogaloo" (2)

  1. If you have a chance (and you still have time), order the wild cherry tomatoes from Salt Spring Seeds. I swear to god the thing practically grew into our house it was so prolific!

    • Thanks, Carlee, I’ll take a look! It’s kind of funny that I have four varieties of tomatoes already on my list, since I can’t eat them very often, myself. My family loves them, though!

      ETA: Oh, that’s too bad — they no longer ship to the US. I’ll check out the US sources they recommend on their website, though.

Share a thought

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: